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How Did… And Soon Will Again… Nephilim Giants Arrive?

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Opening Enoch’s Gates Part 7

By Dr. Thomas Horn


In between the “first incursion” of giants in Genesis 6 and the prophesied future return of these hybrid monstrosities was a so-called “second incursion” of Nephilim, Anakim, Gibborim and even Nimrod, the builder of Babel. This post-Flood presence of giants is confusing to some because 2 Peter 2:5 states that all of the ungodly were destroyed in Noah’s Flood, and Genesis 7 confirms all souls but those on board the ark were killed in the deluge, including the original Nephilim. So how did they (do they?) come back? And does this relate to metaphysical gates?

Some believe the answer to the second (and future) incursion of giants is simple—different Watchers repeated the original sin of their angelic brothers after the Flood, giving birth to a second crop of Nephilim. Hebrew scholars point out that the phrase from Genesis 6:1–2, “when men began to multiply…the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose,” can accurately be translated “whenever men began to multiply,” and thus the sin of the Watchers could have been (and can be) repeated following the Flood. Genesis 6:4 may imply this when it says, “There were giants in the earth in those days [the days before the flood]; and also after that [after the Flood], when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men [again?], and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown” (emphasis added). If this is how the giants returned immediately after the Flood, it makes sense that much fewer were generated the second time around as this second generation of Watchers would have been aware of and feared the judgment that befell the original Watchers, which were now confined “in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day” (Jude 1:6).

A second and more intriguing possibility as to how the giants came back after the Flood involves Watchers’ occultism and the possibility that high-level magic was used to “raise” dead Nephilim back into bodies of flesh. While some may consider that idea too incredible to conceive, there is cause to accept at least the possibility.

How so? According to the book of Jubilees 8:1–5, Kainam, Noah’s grandson found the antediluvian secrets of the Watchers after the Flood:

In the twenty-ninth jubilee, in the first week, in the beginning thereof Arpachshad took to himself a wife and her name was Rasu’eja, the daughter of Susan, the daughter of Elam, and she bare him a son in the third year in this week, and he called his name Kainam.  And the son grew, and his father taught him writing, and he went to seek for himself a place where he might seize for himself a city. And he found a writing which former [pre-flood generations] had carved on the rock, and he read what was thereon, and he transcribed it and sinned owing to it; for it contained the teaching of the Watchers.… And he wrote it down and said nothing regarding it; for he was afraid to speak to Noah about it lest he should be angry with him on account of it. (emphasis added)

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The secret teachings of the Watchers recovered by Kainam could have contained a formula for raising the spirits of dead Nephilim in use with “magic beds” and “magic bracelets” (if Jubilees, considered canon by some and revered by Jews, is to be believed). The Bible itself seems to allude to the efficacy of this ancient dark art, though the knowledge today may be confined only to occult orders such as Freemasons, who do claim the mystical ability to raise “Osiris” from the underworld. The Hebrew prophet Ezekiel made an important statement about “magic bands” (kesatot), which were cryptically used to dispel (magically eject) the souls of men in order to replace those spirits with resurrected ones from the dead (as in the Rephaim or dead Nephilim).

Will ye hunt the souls of my people, and will ye save [Hebrew, chayah, “restore to life”] the souls alive that come unto you…to slay the souls that should not die, and to save [restore to life] the souls alive that should not live…? Wherefore thus saith the Lord God; Behold, I am against your [Kesatot, “magic bands” used for binding and loosing souls], wherewith ye there hunt the souls to make them fly [Parach, “to fly away,” or alternatively “to sprout up from out of the ground”] and I will tear them from your arms, and will let the souls go, even the souls that ye hunt to make them fly (Ez[ekiel] 13:18b–20). (emphasis added)

The kesatot was a magic arm band used in connection with a container called the kiste. Wherever the kiste is inscribed on sarcophagi, it is depicted as a sacred vessel (a spirit prison?) with a snake peering through an open lid. How the magic worked and in what way a spirit was ejected and replaced with a spirit from the dead is a mystery (unless, again, modern occultists have these demonic incantations in their possession today). Pan, the half-man/half-goat god that guarded the entrance to the “gates of hell” at the base of Mount Hermon—beyond which the Rephaim (dead Nephilim) were imprisoned—is sometimes pictured kicking the lid open and letting the snake (spirit?) out. Such loose snakes were then depicted as being enslaved around the limbs and bound in the hair of the Bacchae women, the servants of the demonic god Dionysus. Whatever this imagery of Pan, the serpents, the imprisoned spirits, and the magic kesatot and kiste actually represented, a noteworthy verification of the magical properties represented by them is discussed in the scholarly book Scripture and Other Artifacts by Phillip King and Michael David:

In the closing verses of Ezekiel 13 the prophet turns his attention to magic practices whose details remain obscure. Two key terms are kesatot and mispabot.… The kesatot are worn on the arms, while the mispabot are made “on the head of every height” (?), which has been understood to mean “on the heads of persons of every height” [including those of great height; giants, offspring of the Watchers].…

In modern times archaeological discoveries and texts from Babylonia in particular have shed further light on what might be involved: G. A. Cooke cited Hellenistic figurines from Tell Sandahannah (Mareshah) in Palestine with wire twisted around their arms and ankles…and a magical text from Babylonia that speaks of white and black wool being bound to a person or to someone’s bed.… J. Herrmann [notes] that both words can be related to Akkadian verbs, kasu and sapabu, which mean respectively “to bind” and “to loose.” Herrmann also drew attention to texts in which these verbs were used in a specifically magical sense.… This indicates that, whatever the objects were, their function was to act as “binders” and “loosers” in a magical sense, in other words as means of attack and defense [of spirits] in sorcery.[i]

The text in Ezekiel is believed to specifically refer to Dionysian or Bacchanalian magic, which is important in the context of this book when combined with a related two-part “binding” and “loosing” question from God in Job 38:31: “Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of Orion?” The first part of God’s challenge to Job here involves the star (gate) cluster Pleiades, which in mythology represented the seven sisters or teachers of the infant Dionysus, the very priestesses of whom used the kesatot and kiste to magically “bind” those spirits that Ezekiel said God would “loose.” The second part of God’s proposition to Job is equally meaningful, “Can you…loose the bands [stargate] of Orion?” Studies in recent years have made intriguing findings that suggest the Giza Plateau—which according to Zahi Hawass (former secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities) was known to ancient Egyptians as the “House of Osiris, Lord of the Underground Tunnels”—was designed to reflect the constellation Orion. The three pyramids of Giza do appear to be laid out in a pattern reflecting the three stars of Orion, which is none other than the heavenly representation of Osiris.

In Greek mythology, the god Orion (Osiris) fell in love with Apollo’s sister, Diana (Artemis). Apollo did not like this arrangement and tricked Diana into shooting an arrow into Orion’s head. When she saw what she had done, Diana placed the dead Osiris among the stars and transformed him into the constellation Orion. Thereafter, Orion was thought to be the “Soul of Osiris.”

Earlier history connects the constellation Orion to the Sumerian legend of Gilgamesh, identified in the Bible as Nimrod—the giant “mighty hunter” before the Lord—that fantastic personality who built the Tower of Babel gate and who in later mythology was also called Osiris and Apollo. If Job 38:31 is therefore interpreted according to these ancient astrological and mythological renderings, it would have God asking Job if he could bind the magic bands (kesatot?) of Osiris-Dionysus or loose the bindings (mispabot?) of the mighty hunter, the giant Orion/Gilgamesh/Nimrod/Osiris/Apollo. What is potentially more explosive is the deep possible implication from this text that not only can God do this—that is, loose the forces bound at Giza and the constellation Orion—but that, when the correct time comes, He will. Think Revelation chapter 9.

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Another intriguing aspect related to ancient Watchers magic and the attempt to incarnate giants or “gods” into bodies of flesh may be connected with magic beds and fertility rituals, such as the giant bed of King Og (Deuteronomy 3:11) and a bed identical to his found at the location of the Tower of Babel. Dr. Michael S. Heiser, in his powerful new book, The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible (FREE HARDBACK COLLECTOR’S EDITION IN COLLECTION HERE!), notes:

For an ancient Israelite reader with a command of Hebrew and a worldview that included the idea that supernatural opposition to Israel had something to do with preflood events in Mesopotamia, several things in this short passage would have jumped out immediately. None of them are obvious in English translation.

First, the most immediate link back to the Babylonian polemic is Og’s bed (Hebrew: ʿeres). Its dimensions (9 × 4 cubits) are precisely those of the cultic bed in the ziggurat called Etemenanki—which is the ziggurat most archaeologists identify as the Tower of Babel referred to in the Bible. Ziggurats functioned as temples and divine abodes. The unusually large bed at Etemenanki was housed in “the house of the bed” (bit erši). It was the place where the god Marduk and his divine wife, Zarpanitu, met annually for ritual lovemaking, the purpose of which was divine [procreation] blessing upon the land.

Scholars have been struck by the precise correlation. It’s hard not to conclude that, as with Genesis 6:1–4, so with Deuteronomy 3, those who put the finishing touches on the Old Testament during the exile in Babylon were connecting Marduk and Og in some way. The most transparent path is in fact giant stature. Og is said to have been the last of the Rephaim—a term connected to the giant Anakim and other ancient giant clans in the Transjordan (Deut[eronomy] 2:11, 20). Marduk, like other deities in antiquity, was portrayed as superhuman in size…. The dimensions were roughly six by thirteen feet…

Doak goes on to note that scholars who have detected this connection conclude that the point of matching the dimensions was that the biblical writer wanted to compare Og with a cultic prostitute. This not only is an awkward referent, but fails to consider the wider Babylonian polemic connected back to Gen 6…

Sacred marriage rituals included the blessing of fertility for both the land and its inhabitants. The ritual was also concerned with maintaining the cosmic order instituted by the gods. Consequently, in addition to the giantism element, a link between Og and Marduk via the matching bed dimensions may also have telegraphed the idea that Og was the inheritor and perpetuator of the Babylonian knowledge and cosmic order from before the flood. This would of course tie him back to Gen 6:1–4 and its apkallu polemic. In any event, the size of Og’s bed cannot be taken as a precise indication of Og’s own dimensions. There is much more at play here.[ii]

While Dr. Heiser does not consider whether these magic beds played a role in anything other than symbolic fertility rituals, Marduk’s wife Zarpanitu’s (alternatively zēr-bānītu) name is interpreted as “creatress of seed” and is associated with literal fertility and possibly the ancient idea of divine birth. Whether the Marduk ritual specifically connected the giant bed of Og and the identical one from the infamous Tower of Babel with the raising of Rephaim into bodies of flesh cannot be proven at this time, but is highly suggestive in this writer’s mind. Archaic magic performed for the express purpose of “raising the mighty ones” to life again sits at the core of many ancient themes, including Egyptian and modern Freemasonic ones. Perhaps this is why the scholars behind the Douay-Rheims Bible translated the prophet Isaiah as praying, “Let not the dead live, let not the giants rise again” (26:14).

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[i] Philip J. King, Michael David Coogan, J. Cheryl Exum, Lawrence E. Stager, Scripture and Other Artifacts: Essays on the Bible and Archaeology in Honor of Philip J. King (Westminster John Knox, 1994), 121.

[ii] Michael S. Heiser, The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible (First Edition.; Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2015), 198–199.

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